THE EE LIST: Best Fiction Books of 2015!

This year I read over one hundred books. My main focus was fiction, spirituality and recovery. Today I'll share with you my favorite fiction books from 2015!

AND COME BACK TOMORROW FOR THE BEGINNING OF MY FOUR DAYS OF BOOK GIVEAWAYS!

 

FICTION:


The Girl on the Train: couldn't put this one down. Page-turner. Dark. A bit depressing. No positive takeaway but compelling and gripping read.

All Fall Down: one of Jennifer Weiner's best books. An overwhelmed mom's struggle with addiction to painkillers. Redemptive. Real. Beautiful.

All The Light We Cannot See: the quick-shifts between narrators, settings and times was interesting but also required a level of alertness I couldn't sustain while reading before bed. Best read when fully awake! Ha! Amazing WWII story. Gorgeous descriptive writing.

Goldfinch: worlds-within-worlds. Densely packed narrative and in-depth character development. Rich, languid pace. Will read again and again.

Lila: slow-moving redemptive story, Marilynne Robinson does not disappoint. This is a master writer at the peak of her craft. Such a treat.

Life After Life: very intriguing premise, a bit repetitive at times but well-drawn characters keep it interesting throughout.

The Signature of All Things: probably my favorite book of 2015. Elizabeth Gilbert is a genius. This book is expansive, well-researched, a transport into a different world and time period. Highly recommend.

A Delicate Truth: a subtle examination of the fog of war. Le Carre's understated characters contain all the stiff-upper-lipedness you'd expect from Bristish soldiers and undercover agents, but this only enhances the dire state of the war on terror.

Everything I Never Told You: an enlightening portrayal of an Asian-American family, the ties that bind, tthe unspoken—and yet heavy—expectations upon immigrant families and their children. Heartbreaking. Raw. A bit of a tragic read.

Among the Ten Thousand Things: I finished this book mainly because the author is such a good writer, not because I was terribly interested in the book. It got too depressing for me. A father's affair leads to the disintegration of a family. Beautiful writing, dark subject matter.

Orphan Train: loved this book so much. An eye-opening look into a forgotten piece of American history. Orphaned children separated from any remaining relatives and shipped to the Midwest on trains. Heartbreaking and beautiful.

Elders: an in-depth look into the life of a young Mormon missionary. Utterly fascinating. Tragic. While this is a fictional narrative, it is probably the closest, real look into the life of Mormon missionaries. I came away wondering why in the world ANYONE would send their young 18 or 19 year old kid on a 2 year mission. It also made me think that the Mormon church is way more cultish in practice than I realized.

COME BACK TOMORROW FOR THE BEGINNING OF MY FOUR DAYS OF GIVEAWAYS! :)

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